Friday Sound-Off: Is Slum Tourism a Good or Bad Thing?

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Slum tourism draws over 1 million tourists ever year.

It is a major tourism draw that brings in over a million tourists a year.  Mumbai, New Delhi, LA, Detroit, Copenhagen, and Berlin are all seeing tourists flock to their city to participate.  They aren’t visiting to see world class museums, or theme parks, or historical sites.  These tourists are flocking to these cities to visit the slums.

Ever since the movie Slumdog Millionaire became a major box office success, people have been flocking to Mumbai’s Dharavi slum to see for themselves.  The movie didn’t spur the creation of the Dharavi slum tours, but it did amplify the demand for the tours.  And that amplification has been massive.

Slum tourism, as it is often called, isn’t anything new.  All the way back in the 19th Century, wealthy aristocrats in London and New York would visit the disadvantaged areas of the city to view the slums.  It just so happens that this increased curiosity in the slums of the cities coincided with the invention of photography.

As images of these impoverished areas began to circulate, people started to become curious and wanted to see for themselves.  This curiosity has never abated, as this curiosity has only grown exponentially as photography, video, and the media has grown.

Today, these slum tours consist of visits to schools, education centers, and other sites where non-profit organizations are working with these communities.  The goal is to show tourists what is being done to better these communities, and show tourists what they can do to assist.

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Slum tour companies often show tourists what is being done to assist these poorer communities and tell them how they can assist.

 

So this leads us to the question of whether this slum tourism is a good or bad thing?  I am sure some slum tour operators would argue that these tours bring attention to neighborhoods that are desperately in need to assistance.  However, others would argue that none of the money from these tours usually makes it back into these neighborhoods.

Personally, we don’t like these tours.  To us it feels as though these people are being used.  Sure, it does bring some much needed attention to these impoverished neighborhoods, but we aren’t sure it is actually affecting any real change in these communities.  A vast majority of the money being generated by slum tour operators never actually makes it back to the people who live there.

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Some people question how much of the money made from slum tourism actually makes it back into these poorer communities.

What are your thoughts?  Do you think slum tourism is a good or bad thing?  Do you think it is helping or exploiting these communities?  What better ways can we assist those in these communities who are less fortunate?  We want to hear from you.

About Josh Hewitt

Avid traveler and photographer who loves to see new places, meet new people, and experience new things. There is so much this world can teach us, we just need to explore!
This entry was posted in Friday Sound-Offs, Opinions and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Friday Sound-Off: Is Slum Tourism a Good or Bad Thing?

  1. Caterina says:

    I agree with you. I don’t think all attention is good attention… If you want to volunteer or donate to an organization that really works in these neighbourhoods, then do so. But tours…nah.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Jenny says:

    I detest this form of travel. It does nothing to help the people of the slums. The tour operators have no interest in improving their conditions … because then there’d be nowhere for them to tour.

    Liked by 1 person

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